Posts Tagged ideas

Ideas

A few days ago I watched the second half of a movie from 1974, called “The White Dawn,” about three whalers, two Caucasian and one African American (played by Warren Oates, Timothy Bottoms, and Louis Gossett, Jr.) who get trapped in the Arctic, and have to rely on the local Eskimos to survive.  The movie takes place in the late 19th century, and the natives rescue them from a hunk of ice in the Arctic Ocean.  They take them into their extended family and feed them, and generally keep them alive until, ostensibly, they can get back to the civilization they are more familiar with.  I found it interesting to watch the use of Eskimo culture in the movie: life, fishing, killing seals, building igloos, etc.  The terrain was fascinating too, especially the way the ice, snow, rock, and water came together to produce a real otherworldly—and in a color movie an almost black-and-white—landscape.  From the list of names that scrolled across the screen at the end of the movie, it appears that real Eskimo people were used as actors in the movie, not Caucasians made up to look like them (as so often happens in American western and Indian movies).  The outsiders bring to the Eskimo culture some of their own culture such as booze, sex, and a sort of “me-first” attitude that the Eskimos don’t have.  Eskimos live in a severe environment and depend on one another for survival.  A “lone wolf” or “loose cannon” type of person could jeopardize the entire extended family.  Eventually the outsiders make some home brew and get some of the Eskimos inebriated.  One young woman gets so warm from drinking the concoction that she strips to the waist and goes outside the igloo, but collapses in the snow and eventually freezes to death.  The outsiders are subsequently either run off or killed, and the movie ends.

But as I watched the movie, I began to take it in as a writer would, and I realized there are things in this movie I can use in my next novel.  I have in the back of my mind an idea for a science-fiction novel, and I’ve begun to make notes about plot, characters, terrain on a far distant planet, the natives, and so on.  But within that movie, details of Eskimo culture could be adapted to my fictional characters.  I would never transfer Eskimo culture directly to a made-up culture, of course, but broad concepts such as dance, sex, life in general, hunting, terrain, housing, and so forth, could form the basis for the fictional culture’s life.  And I certainly don’t mean to pick on Eskimo culture alone here either; far from it.  There are many different cultures around this blue and brown and green and white globe we live on that ideas about culture can be gleaned from many, many different areas.  It’s just that I happened to be watching an Eskimo movie at the time.

Some non-writers ask authors, “Where do you get your ideas?”  That’s especially true of sci-fi writers.  Well, here’s one answer: the movies.  (I’ve heard that some people get their ideas at Sears, but I never have.)  Ideas are a dime a dozen.  They’re all around us.  Some good ideas come from the movies, some appear in the newspaper, some from politics or science, or whatever—you name it.  This one movie I watched just goes to show you (pun intended) that ideas can come anytime, anywhere.  Just keep your mind open.

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