Archive for December, 2016

So You Want To Be A Writer

Not long ago I happened to overhear someone say they like to write, and were starting to write short stories.  They didn’t ask me this question specifically, but I began to wonder, what would I say if someone asked me, “How do I go about becoming a writer and get published?”  It helps, of course, to have a modicum of talent, but barring that, what should a newbie do to start a writing career?  I’m assuming you want to go all the way and get published somewhere, but even if you only want to write for yourself and never show it to others, what can you do?  Here are a few suggestions I have to readers of this blog as to how to start.  Take or reject any or all.

  1. Start writing.  Just sit down and start.  Whether you write on a computer, on a legal pad, on a typewriter, or on a mirror with the blood of a vampire, it doesn’t matter how good it is, just get it down.  You can revise it later when you’ve learned more about the craft.  Put your ideas down before you forget them.  Make notes to yourself.  If you’re doing a family history, get Uncle Joe’s reminiscences down before he croaks.
  2. Read writing magazines.  There are several good writing magazines out there.  I have subscriptions to Writer’s Digest, The Writer, and Poet’s and Writers, but several others exist and you shouldn’t be limited to these.  Writing magazines such as these are the most concentrated form of information about the art and craft of writing you can get.  I started with a subscription to my first one almost as soon as I started writing.
  3. Read books and stories in your genre.  But, and this is very important, read outside your genre.  If you want to write prose, read poetry.  And then decide you will write prose in as lyrical style you can, influenced by the poetry you read.
  4. Read books on writing.  A hugely popular book is William Strunk, Jr., and E.B White’s The Elements of Style.  And it won’t break your budget to get a copy.  But there are others, such as Stephen King’s book On Writing, Donald Maass’s books, in particular, Writing the Breakout Novel, and Writing 21st Century Fiction, or Oakley Hall’s How Fiction Works.  But don’t be limited to these.  Check online and check your library.
  5. Join a critique group.  Find a group that either accepts all forms of writing, or at least is limited to your favorite genre.  Submit your work to the others in the group and listen to what they say.  But also, read and critique the others.  This gives you experience in looking for what works and what doesn’t in a manuscript.  Some critique groups are online.  Check out Lit Reactor.
  6. Join a writing group.  Preferably one that has regular meetings.  If they have a guest speaker, listen to what the speaker has to say.  Some groups have open mic nights where you can read, and sometimes get feedback.  Go.  Listen.  Enjoy.
  7. Start attending writer’s conventions.  You can find these listed in many magazines.  Look for one in your area.  Or look for one that specializes in your genre.  There will be an expense involved, but it may be tax deductible.  There will be speakers who will have a lot of good info in what you are interested in, and there will be speakers who don’t have much to say to you.  Listen to all.
  8. Get an MFA in creative writing.  This may take several years, but many universities have low-residency programs where you only have to be on campus for a short time each year.  But they are intense, and you will learn a lot.  Plus, you get those letters after your name.
  9. Round up beta readers.  You are the alpha reader of your work.  But you will eventually need someone to read your entire manuscript and give you feedback.  This is someone you trust to be objective, yet ruthless.  No one in your family is that person.  You will want someone at a distance, yet someone you know and trust.  You may even find someone online.
  10. Read other writer’s manuscripts.  In other words, be a beta reader for some other beginning writer.
  11. Start a list of where you’d like to submit your manuscripts.  Usually in your genre, although you might be submitting to a magazine that publishes works of many genres.  Do you like dogs?  Submit to the dog magazines.  Poetry?  Many literary journals take poetry.  You can find lists of magazines (there are thousands out there) in the backs of writing magazines, and in reference books.  Check your bookstore or library.
  12. If you have completed a manuscript, start looking for agents or publishers.  Start this list even before the manuscript is complete and thoroughly revised and edited.  Again, writing magazines have lists of these, and reference books abound with lists of agents and publishers and what they’re looking for.  Try online too.  Check each agent or publisher’s website for what they want.
  13. If you prefer, start looking into self-publishing.  You can publish your own book, and not be bothered by agents and publishers.  But beware, you’ll want to have your book edited by an independent editor, and a good cover designed by an independent artist.  Remember, you’re taking on the job of publisher yourself, and, let’s face it, you, as a beginner, aren’t a good editor or publisher.  Get others to help you.
  14. Talk to other writers.  Network to get the inside scoop.  Tips and suggestions that no one else talks about.
  15. Set up a website or a blogsite to advertise your book.  Start thinking about this even before your book is published.
  16. Visit the library.  ‘Nuf said.
  17. Don’t quit your day job.

Stop reading this and start writing.

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Some Of The Older Books

In this Christmas season, I decided to look back at some of the books I’ve purchased or been given over the years.  Of all the books I have, two stand out as being almost unique.  Back in 1955, my grandfather gave me two books which I’ve kept longer than any others I own.  I still use them and refer to them occasionally.  Neither are books that tell any type of story; they’d be considered reference books if they had to be catalogued.  But I still have them.

The first is the Rand McNally Standard World Atlas of 1955.  Or, in Roman numerals, MCMLV.  Atlases have always been important books, for everybody, especially for authors.  It helps to know a little about the place you’re setting your story, and an atlas is a good starting point.  But the main reason I’ve kept this book is not just its maps and descriptions of places (it has a large section called “Places of Interest in the United States” with pictures and descriptions of various sites in the USA) but because it has railroads on most of the maps, rather than the roads found on maps today.  On the maps of the US and Canada, the railroads are identified.  Since I’ve been fascinated by railroads for a long time, and have done some model railroading, I’ve kept this atlas largely because of those railroads.

The second is a picture book called Wild Animals Of The World.  It has portraits of most of the wild animals we’re familiar with, either from seeing them in zoos or in the wild, and even some we’re not familiar with.  The portraits were painted by Mary Baker, and the text was written by William Bridges of (at the time) the New York Zoological Park.  It also has an introduction by Roy Chapman Andrews.  Each animal is represented on one page with its portrait at the top and text below.  From my point of view, what’s interesting about the book is its timelessness.  The portraits are exceedingly well done and accurate, and the information in the text has held up all these years.  I go back to it now and then, partly to refresh my memory about certain animals, and partly to look up new ones.

Both books have held up reasonably well over the years, though the atlas is worse for wear.  The spine has fallen off, and the two covers are entirely separate pieces (I know, I should have it rebound), but I still use it.  But what is most interesting about these two books is the fact that I’ve kept them for so long.  And that reveals the vital importance of books: if you give a book as a present, you never know how long it’ll last.  The oddest book may be the one most cherished by its owner.  Books are the repository of all knowledge, and you don’t need a battery to turn them on.  Neither is great book, in the manner of, say, a Dickens novel or a compilation of Longfellow poetry.  They’re just regular books that happened to appeal to someone well beyond what might reasonably be expected.  I doubt that my grandfather had any idea I’d keep these books this long (61 years and counting).

Give books for Christmas (or for any other reason).

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A Slight Disagreement

I’ve been trying to get a science fiction novel published for over fifteen years now, and during that time I’ve learned a lot about the art and craft of writing.  I’ve read magazines and books, both about writing and in my chosen genre, I’ve attended meetings and conventions, I’ve heard speaker after speaker both at meetings and in private, I’ve been a member of several critique groups, and a lot of stuff has been thrown at me over the years, all about writing in general, and novels in particular.  In this post, I would like to comment on three admonitions that have been handed down from tutor to pupil almost without comment for many years.  I feel they’re a little off the mark, and I think writers will adhere to them at their peril.  For example:

  1.  They say: Do not let anything interrupt you from your writing.  Writing should be the most important thing in your life.  Shut out all else and make writing the most important focus in your life.  This is dead wrong.  The most important focus in your life should be your health, not your writing.  Don’t let your writing interfere with staying healthy.  Get out and exercise.  Go walking.  Lift weights.  Swim.  Jog on a treadmill.  Watch what you eat.  Keep your weight down.  Keep your blood sugar and blood pressure down.  In short, keep your health in the best possible condition.  It won’t do you any good if you have a heart attack at age 40 because you’ve been sedentary and you sat for long hours in front of a computer screen writing Nobel and Pulitzer prize-winning novels.  It’s hard to write from a hospital bed under sedation.  Instead of worrying about how you could be writing while you’re exercising, you should be worrying about what you could do to exercise while you sit in front of that damn computer.  Being sedentary is hazardous to your health.
  2. Keep track of your word count while you write.  Put your daily word count on Facebook and proclaim it proudly to the world.  Okay, this isn’t a bad idea, though I don’t know about the Facebook thing, but my disagreement with this admonition stems from the fact that word counts are useful only when writing the first draft.  Like you may have done on NaNoWriMo.  How many words did you write every day?  But once you finish that first draft, you have to revise.  And revise again.  And again.  And so forth.  Word counts don’t apply very well to revisions, but I’ve heard of authors who maintain they write a certain number of words every day.  Without fail.  That may be true, but when do they revise?  Are there authors who are working on a new draft all the time?  My feeling is, don’t worry about the word count once you get to the revision stage.  Concentrate on making the book the best you can.  Your final word count is the most important.
    I’ve heard some writers say they write a certain number of words everyday.  Usually around 1000.  If so, that means they put down 365,000 words a year.  That’s three to four novels, but only the first drafts.  When do they revise?
  3. Write everyday.  Fine, if you want to do this, I’m all for it.  My feeling is that it’s not that important.  However, like any skill, constant repetition will help to make it better, and a daily writing habit is a good idea.  Write in a journal.  Write for 5 minutes a day.  Ten minutes.  Work on revising your latest work.  But don’t turn depressed and suicidal if you miss a day.  If you play a musical instrument, you may have been told the same thing: practice every day.  It’s the same idea.  The great pianist Artur Rubenstein is reported to have once said, “If I don’t practice for one day, I can tell.  If I don’t practice for two days, my wife can tell.  If I don’t practice for three days, everybody can tell.”  Perhaps that’s enough said.

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